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'The Forestroamer' is proof positive that Woebegone Obscured have never stopped thinking outside the box when it comes to creating menacingly beautiful Doom atmospheres.
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Traditional Doom sustained by authoritative drumming, powerful riffs, dark melodic patterns that connect them right to the mighty forefathers The Obsessed
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Demon Eye : Prophecies And Lies


Demon Eye deliver another scintillatingly well-crafted vintage retro outing with their third album.



Recorded in their home town of Raleigh in North Carolina by Mike Dean of Corrosion of Conformity, 'Prophecies and Lies' sees Demon Eye return with their third full length album. In keeping with previous releases, it's a stomping riff-driven blast of groove-laden proto-metal and traditional Doom. Whilst the band delve into the past and wear their '70s and '80s influences on their sleeves, it's carried out with sufficient vibrancy and energy, for it to sound fresh and vital.

Clocking in at around 45 minutes, with most tracks - apart from the epic finale, 'Morning's Son' - at around three or four minutes, it's an album that provides a series of primal, concise hits of vintage Doom n' Roll. Opening track, 'The Waters and the Wild' sets a swaggering riff with shades of the earthy, rough and ready Di'Anno Maiden era, and a soaring high pitched classic rock scream from vocalist, Bill Eagen. Eagen's voice straddles the territory between Robert Plant's ear-shattering shriek and Ozzy's bruised drawl and compliments the vintage sound of the band perfectly.

Sounding like a lost underground classic from the early '70s, the album features some sterling guitar interplay from the aforementioned Eagen -who doubles up on vocal and guitar duties - and lead player Larry Burlison that would grace either of the two Di'Anno Maiden albums. 'In the Spider's Eye' offers some superb back and forth action between the two, before slowing down to a crawling Doom pace, Paul Walz's hypnotic bassline seeing the track to a reflective conclusion. The relatively short (at least compared to many in the Doom genre) duration of most of the tracks ensures there is no filler; each one is a lean, snarling burst of energy. Well crafted riffs are complimented by memorable choruses and thoughtful lyrics; 'Kismet' featuring a fantastically Doom-laden lament of 'so you lost your way through life/never won, never did things right/never found someone to take your side'. It doesn't get much more Doom(ed) than that.

There's not necessarily any new ground covered on 'Prophecies and Lies', but the '70s and '80s are plundered to produce material with a scintillating energy that is delivered with no little skill. 'Power of One', in its trim three minutes, packs in a bluesy, hook-laden riff that would put a spring in the most jaded of steps on a cold February day, and is a joyous blast of vintage metal. If you like your Doom with a liberal dose of '70s groove and swagger, this album from Raleigh's finest is a must. Fat riffs, irresistible hooks and lean, well balanced songs deliver a rollicking Doom party. Light the patchouli, blow the froth off a cold one, roll yourself a Camberwell Carrot and enjoy the ride.


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Reviewer's rating: 8/10

Information

Tracklist :
1. The Waters And The Wild
2. In The Spider's Eye
3. Redeemer
4. Kismet
5. Infinite Regress
6. Dying For It
7. Politic Divine
8. Power Of One
9. Vagabond
10. Prophecies And Lies
11. Morning's Son

Duration : Approx. 45 minutes

Visit the Demon Eye bandpage.

Reviewed on 2018-02-11 by Nick Harkins
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