Aesthetic Death
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Philosophic writings about Death 
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Post Philosophic writings about Death

This topic is open to any kind of philosophic writings about death and themes related to death. You can show us your ideas and your visions about death, and about the beauty related to death (funerals, graves, and other things you wish to talk about). Please talk about some philosophic texts that you read or you are reading, and other books that talk about death. This is a open topic to anyone that whats to share is ideas, and thoughts about death, and about the aesthetics of death.


Mon Jul 16, 2007 9:17 am
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A friend of mine said once: "death is the worst thing that can happen to you. It kills you".

You will find thousands of books which tell you the contrary.

There are some other sources, however, that will show you how foolish is to take death lightly and how there is literally a mortal danger in believing in a non physical afterlife.

I am not allowed to talk any further about this here.

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Mon Jul 16, 2007 10:34 am
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There are some other sources, however, that will show you how foolish is to take death lightly and how there is literally a mortal danger in believing in a non physical afterlife.

Who's taking death lightly? Maybe i wasn't very clear when i tried to explain myself. Do you think death as a subject not to talk about? Death is one ofthe most interesting subjects to talk about, it's a interesting enigma, isn't it?

there is literally a mortal danger in believing in a non physical afterlife. Why do you believe in that? What takes you to believe in that? Do you believe in a place in afterlife? Do you believe in re-encarnation? Please, explain what you mean with that? I'm very interested in hearing about that.


Mon Jul 16, 2007 4:18 pm
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"The dead know only one thing: it is far better to be alive."

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Mon Jul 16, 2007 4:50 pm
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As Doomguru Kozzy P. put it on our first album:

we, the dead, can not understand
why these mortals don't envy us
in silence and peace we rest, but we don't exist

...

beautiful is our realm
our kingdom no one can resist
in solitude's eternal bliss
together we shall not exist


:meditate:

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Mon Jul 16, 2007 5:12 pm
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John Maynard Keynes quotes: "In the long run we are all dead"

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Tue Jul 17, 2007 4:52 pm
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

you are longer dead than alive. think about it ;)


Mon Feb 11, 2013 6:07 pm
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

Oh my gosh, we're all gonna die! :(

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Mon Feb 11, 2013 9:39 pm
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

I was planning to give it a miss, myself, but if that falls through then plan B is to follow Lord Palmerston's (possibly apocryphal) advice -
"Die, my dear doctor? That is the last thing I shall do!".





Or maybe Spike Milligan's, whose gravestone reads "I told you I was ill!"

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Mon Feb 11, 2013 10:34 pm
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

Didn't someone once say or write something along the lines of "Bury me face down so the whole world can kiss my ass"?

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Mon Feb 11, 2013 10:58 pm
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

d.mimøsa wrote:
Didn't someone once say or write something along the lines of "Bury me face down so the whole world can kiss my ass"?


that's philosphical indead, of some high standard furthermore. Wasn't it Leibnitz? Or Kant, more surely.

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Tue Feb 12, 2013 6:58 am
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

Julie Halpern... :D

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Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:56 am
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

When I was sixteen or seventeen or so, I wrote a song called "Death Is Our Destiny"; then, some time later, Anathema wanted to make me believe that destiny is dead! It didn't make any sense! :(

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Tue Feb 12, 2013 4:18 pm
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

I wrote an entire album based around my struggles coming to terms with the fact that, someday, I will cease to exist, along with everything that has ever and will ever exist. To be honest, it still scares the shit out of me sometimes. I used to be Christian, but once I hit 19 or so I started having doubts, and then denounced religion altogether by the time I hit 21. I started reading up on cosmology, philosophy, and buddhist thought, and still felt lost. If anything I felt more alone. As time wore on, I began to find solace in knowing that this is the only chance any of us will ever get at life, so we had better make the best of it. Almost like an optimistic nihilism (nothing we do matters in the long run, so we might as well have as much fun and be as productive as possible while we are here). Evangelical religious people have told me that, if there is no heaven or hell, then there is no incentive to do any good in the world. I find the opposite to be true, since having one life and no soul equalizes every living being, thereby making ALL life sacred. Also, I still get goosebumps when I think about how all of the atoms that make up everything we see once was and will one day be part of stars and other cosmic debris.


Lately I've found Tolkien's writings on death and what happens to his various characters in Middle-Earth to be really interesting.


Thu Feb 14, 2013 1:56 am
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

The best recent philosophical work about death that I have read is Mark Johnston's "Surviving Death". It's a very difficult book, but if you're really interested in the topic, that would be my number 1 recommendation.


Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:37 am
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

To begin with, a quote and a paraphrase, then some of my own ramblings.

Firslty, I agree wholeheartedly with the Yossarian, the protagonist in Joseph Heller's novel Catch 22: "I intend to live forever. Or die trying."

One of the early Greco-Roman philosophers (I can't remember exactly whom off the top of my head, but it was probably one of the Roman Stoics) said something like "death is nothing to be feared. While you live, death is not. When death is, you are not".

I think there's something attractive in that thought. Death will be like the year 1900. Not being filled with dread at the thought of the year 1900, arguably we should be similarly calm in the face of our non-existence in the year 2100.
Of course, the thought that death is not something we will ever experience, precisely because at the moment of our we will cease to experience anything at all kind of misses the point. For me at least, it's precisely the cessation of all of my experiences and projects which makes death such an unsettling prospect. I think that what gives my life purpose are precisely those projects and enterprises with which I'm engaged. Whether it's trying to write a novel, carve out a career as a philosopher, or be a good husband and father, all those projects, taken together, are the source of life's value for me. To consider their coming to an end is a terrible prospect.
Yet I also think that it's only because of our mortality that life can be said to have any meaning at all. If we lived forever, then I think life would lose any sense of meaning or achievement. Why write that book/album/poem now, rather than in ten, twenty, a hundred, or a thousand years? And having done so, who would care about your achievement? Given an infinite amount of time, who couldn't write an even better book/album/poem? What makes any life notable is that all its achievements are made despite its finitude.

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Fri Mar 01, 2013 12:45 pm
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

It was Epicurus who said that. (And he was neither a Stoic nor a Greco-Roman, but rather the founder of his own school of thought (Epicureanism) and Greek.)

I'm not sure whether I agree with you that death gives life its meaning, by the way, but I do think that denying death (as most religions do) makes life (nearly) meaningless (or valueless), and perhaps that is almost the same.


Sat Mar 02, 2013 12:51 am
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

Lajos wrote:
but I do think that denying death (as most religions do) makes life (nearly) meaningless (or valueless), and perhaps that is almost the same.


You're wrong about the place that the great religions gives to death. Catholicism, for example, has until very recently, until roughly its relegation to the private sphere – a movement that was started by the French Revolution, made of death the pinnacle of life on earth, death is the meaning of life. For the Christian, death is the possibility of a final resurrection in the love of Christ - or hell for sinners. This is the ultimate goal and purpose of the life of every believer on earth to be with Christ.
The fear of hell is fundamental in Christian rhetoric. For centuries, religious believers have been taught to despise life: life is not worth living, it is a vale of tears, a bed of suffering, each of us carries in itself, consubstantially, the weight of original sin, we are so to speak doomed from the very first moment of our conception (that's also why they invented the concept of the Immaculate Conception for Mary). Only prayer and good deeds can save the soul of the believer and ensure him a place in heaven where for the first time he will find peace.

It must be also said that if religion teaches contempt for life, and praises death, it prohibits voluntary death, suicide was a serious sin that leads its author to hell. This kind of contradictions, made worse by the traumatic visions of hell depicted by priests in the pulpit has led many to real despair, to madness or, ironically, to suicide.

I don't think modern rethorics in religion are obscuring death. Modern social habits do, but that movement is largely disconnected from religious behaviours.

So in the end, while being wrong in the premises, you're right in the end: religions do teach the fear and disgust of life. Or did teach, because with the turmoil of modern life, the dominating individualism that religions have had to take into account, life has become a more precious value.

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Sat Mar 02, 2013 6:31 am
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

baphomet wrote:
For centuries, religious believers have been taught to despise life

Isn't that exactly what I said (or wrote)?


Sat Mar 02, 2013 12:07 pm
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Post Re: Philosophic writings about Death

well no, you said religions have taught to deny death. Or were denying death. It's the exact opposite in fact.

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Sat Mar 02, 2013 12:27 pm
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